fbpx

Alzheimer’s Disease Study

Alzheimer’s is a devastating type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly in the sixth to eighth decade, and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. As our population ages, effective treatments to slow down and even reverse Alzheimer’s are desperately needed.  At New England Institute for Clinical Research, we currently are working on just that.

  • This study is for patients with prodromal to mild Alzheimer’s Disease. This is a long-term study evaluating a new oral medication that is taken daily. There is a chance of receiving placebo in this study. All patients will need to have a designated study partner, or someone who spends a significant enough time with them to give objective feedback on their day to day life. This study is looking to see if the new medication is effective in slowing or even stopping the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Click the button to view more information about this study on clinicaltrials.gov. Learn More
  • Alzheimer’s and Dementia can sometimes bring with it a sort of wanderlust. This study is for patients who suffer from dementia that also have a tendency who wander away or get lost. The hope for this study is to reduce the amount of wandering and the distress or injury that can happen. A great thing about this study is that there is both a placebo-controlled portion and an Open label, so there will definitely be a point where patients receive the active medication. Click the button to view more information about this study on clinicaltrials.gov. Learn More

All studies and study related procedures come at no cost to you. There may be some compensation to you for travel and time. Participation is completely voluntary, and you may withdraw at any time. If you would like to know more about our studies, please fill out the form below or give us a call at 203-914-1903.

Use the form below to let us know you are interested:

Clinical Study Enrollment - Alzheimer’s Disease
First
Last
Sending